Manton, Lincolnshire

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Manton
Lincolnshire
Cleatham Hall - geograph.org.uk - 138491.jpg
Cleatham Hall
Location
Grid reference: SE932025
Location: 53°30’40"N, 0°35’43"W
Data
Population: 123  (2011)
Post town: Gainsborough
Postcode: DN21
Local Government
Council: North Lincolnshire
Parliamentary
constituency:
Scunthorpe

Manton is a village and parish in the Lindsey part of Lincolnshire. The population of the civil parish at the 2011 census was 123.[1] The village is situated just south from the town of Scunthorpe, and about six miles south-west from the town of Brigg.

The parish includes the hamlet of Cleatham, which forms part of Corringham Wapentake, while the remainder of the parish forms part of Manley Wapentake.[2] Cleatham was a civil parish between 1866 and 1936.[3]

St Hybald's church, Manton

The parish church is a Grade II listed building dedicated to Saint Hybald. It was built of limestone in 1861 by J. M. Hooker, and Wheeler of Tunbridge Wells.[4] The church was made redundant by the Diocese of Lincoln in 1998, and it was sold for residential use in 2003.[5] Its parson from 1568 was John Robotham, who was accused of missing evening prayers and even Easter communion in order to play bowls. He had a number of legal battles with parishioners, some of whom he served a summons on during church services.[6]

Cleatham Hall is a Grade-II listed house dating from 1855 but with earlier origins.[7]

Cleatham bowl barrow is a Bronze Age scheduled monument located about 200 yds to the east of Cleatham Hall.[8]

The last known player of the Lincolnshire bagpipes, John Hunsley, lived in Manton in the mid-1800s.[9]

References

  1. "Civil parish population 2011". Neighbourhood Statistics. Office for National Statistics. http://www.neighbourhood.statistics.gov.uk/dissemination/LeadKeyFigures.do?a=7&b=11126288&c=Manton&d=16&e=62&g=6382507&i=1001x1003x1032x1004&m=0&r=1&s=1461063369438&enc=1. Retrieved 19 April 2016. 
  2. "Manton". A Vision of Britain through Time. University of Portsmouth. http://www.visionofbritain.org.uk/relationships.jsp?u_id=10435377&c_id=10001043. Retrieved 11 July 2011. 
  3. "Cleatham". A Vision of Britain through Time. University of Portsmouth. http://www.visionofbritain.org.uk/relationships.jsp?u_id=10407904. Retrieved 11 July 2011. 
  4. National Heritage List England no. 1346833: St Hybald (Grade II) (listing)
  5. "Manton". Genuki.org.uk. http://www.genuki.org.uk/big/eng/LIN/Manton/. Retrieved 11 July 2011. 
  6. Judith Maltby, Prayer Book and People, p.70
  7. National Heritage List England no. 1083030: Cleatham House (Grade II) (listing)
  8. National Heritage List England no. 1007729: Cleatham Round Barrow
  9. A commentator the 1881 Oxford Journals' Notes and queries, pp.95-96, noted that Hunsley played the pipes until shortly before his death, which occurred "between twenty and thirty years ago."

Further reading

  • Manton in Kelly's Directory of Lincolnshire with the Port of Hull and Neighbourhood. With Map of the County. by E. R. Kelly, 1885
  • Leahy, Kevin (July–August 2007). "A warning to the curious: digging an Anglo-Saxon cemetery". Current Archaeology 18, No.6 (210): 26–31.  Article on the excavation of the Anglo-Saxon cemetery at Cleatham, the third largest in England.
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