Chute Forest

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Chute Forest
Wiltshire, Hampshire
Lodge Lane, Chute Forest (geograph 4392764).jpg
Lodge Lane, Chute Forest
Location
Location: 51°15’50"N, 1°33’29"W
Data
Population: 180  (2011[1])
Post town: Andover
Postcode: SP11
Dialling code: 01264
Local Government
Council: Wiltshire
Parliamentary
constituency:
Devizes
Website: The Chutes

Chute Forest is a village and parish in eastern Wiltshire, adjacent to the border with Hampshire. Indeed the civil parish extends into the latter county at the south-eastern corner: Between 1820 and 1839 this area, called Wakeswood, was added to, or acknowledged to be part of, the parish, presumably because the overseers of Chute Forest began to relieve paupers living on it.

The village itself is about five miles north-west of Andover and three miles to the east of Ludgershall.

History

The area was a large royal forest by the 13th century[2] and continued in Crown ownership until 1639. It was then an extra-parochial area by the name of East and West Walks of the Forest of Chute (in the county of Wilts) and Wakeswood (in the county of Southampton) until it became a civil parish in the 19th century, and an ecclesiastical parish in 1875 after the church was built.[3]

The Chute Hoard

A hoard of Iron Age coins found in the north-east in 1927 (with further coins found in 1986 and 1994) is the only evidence of prehistoric activity in the parish. The coins are from the 1st century BC. The British Museum holds 36 coins[4] while the Wiltshire Museum at Devizes has others, together with the hollow flint nodule in which they were found.[5]

Chute Lodge

Chute Lodge, in the centre of the parish, is a country house built in red brick in 1768 by Sir Robert Taylor, on or near the site of an earlier house. In 1988 the house was designated as Grade-I listed.[6]

Parish church

St Mary's Church, 600 yards north of Chute Lodge, was built between 1870 and 1871 to designs by J.L. Pearson and consecrated in 1875.[3] It has been designated as a Grade-II* listed building[7] and is now in the care of the Churches Conservation Trust.[8]

References

  1. "Chute Forest Census Information". Wiltshire Community History. Wiltshire Council. http://history.wiltshire.gov.uk/community/getcensus.php?id=72. Retrieved 2 November 2014. 
  2. Crittall, Elizabeth, ed. "Victoria County History - Wiltshire - Vol 4 pp391-433 - Royal forests". University of London. http://www.british-history.ac.uk/vch/wilts/vol4/pp391-433. Retrieved 16 April 2016. 
  3. 3.0 3.1 Crowley, D.A., ed. "Victoria County History - Wiltshire - Vol 16 - Kinwardstone Hundred - Chute Forest". University of London. http://www.british-history.ac.uk/vch/wilts/vol16/pp120-126. Retrieved 15 April 2016. 
  4. "Search result: Chute Forest". https://www.britishmuseum.org/research/collection_online/search.aspx?place=75432. Retrieved 15 April 2016. 
  5. Cunnington, B. Howard (December 1929). "A Hoard of British Coins found at Chute". Wiltshire Archaeological & Natural History Magazine 44: 236–239. https://archive.org/details/wiltshirearchaeo441927. Retrieved 15 April 2016. 
  6. National Heritage List England no. 1364573: Chute Lodge (Historic England)
  7. "Church of St Mary". Images of England. English Heritage. http://www.imagesofengland.org.uk/Details/Default.aspx?id=312306. Retrieved 4 October 2010. 
  8. "St Mary, Chute Forest". Churches Conservation Trust. http://www.visitchurches.org.uk/Ourchurches/Completelistofchurches/St-Marys-Church-Chute-Forest-Wiltshire/. Retrieved 4 October 2010. 

Outside links

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