Ballyclogh, County Cork

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Ballyclogh
Irish: Baile Cloch
County Cork
Castles of Munster - Ballyclogh, Cork - geograph.org.uk - 1393398.jpg
Ballyclogh tower house
Location
Grid reference: R492020
Location: 52°10’3"N, 8°44’35"W
Data
Population: 259  (2016)
Local Government
Parliamentary
constituency:
Cork East

Ballyclogh or Ballyclough is a small village five miles outside Mallow, County Cork, Ireland. The name Ballyclogh has its origins in the past abundance of stone quarries in the area.

The name of the village is from the Irish Baile Cloch, meaning 'Town of stones'.

The village has a tower house, built by the Barry family (or Mac Robert-Barry).[1] In 1641 it was forfeit to the Purdon family, and then, in 1691, surrendered to the Crown following the victory of King William III over James II. It was renovated during the 19th century, but is now in ruins.

The village today has a public house, a local grocer, a community centre, playground, funeral chapel and Roman Catholic church. Ballyclogh has a rich history of farming; Ballyclogh Creamery was founded in the early 1900s and grew to join forces with Mitchelstown Co-op to form Dairygold Co-Op.[2]

Major-General Henry Green Barry, the father of the famous jurist Sir Redmond Barry (1813–1880), Q.C., was from Ballyclogh. Sir Redmond, who became a leading judge in the Colony of Victoria, was the presiding judge at the final trial of Ned Kelly in Melbourne.

The Rev Samuel Hayman (1818–1886) noted that when first mentioned in 1291 it was called "Labane" – meaning the "fair district", and acquired the name Ballyclogh when the local castle was built by the Barry family in 1591.

Another 19th-century antiquarian, the Rev JF Lynch, wrote that "Ballyclogh is named Lathbán in taxation of 1302, and in taxation of 1306 is named Lachbán, and this 'Lathbán' or 'Lachbán' is given as 'Lavan' by Lewis, who names this parish 'Ballyclough or Lavan.'"[3] An area close to village centre still goes by the name 'Lachbán' - (pronounced Ly-bawn), just west of the 'Smithfield' area and approximately 400 meters from the castle.

References