Difference between revisions of "Loch Ericht"

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(Created page with "Loch Etricht from Beinn Bheòil {{county|Inverness-shire}} '''Loch Ericht''' is a freshwater loch of the Highlands lying across ...")
 
 
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[[File:Loch Ericht.jpg|right|thumb|350px|Loch Etricht from Beinn Bheòil]]
 
[[File:Loch Ericht.jpg|right|thumb|350px|Loch Etricht from Beinn Bheòil]]
 
{{county|Inverness-shire}}
 
{{county|Inverness-shire}}
'''Loch Ericht''' is a freshwater loch of the [[Highlands]] lying across the border between [[Perthshire]] and the [[Inverness-shire]].  It is {{convert|351|m|ft|0|x}} above sea level and has a north-east to south-west orientation.
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'''Loch Ericht''' is a freshwater loch of the [[Highlands]], lying across the border between [[Perthshire]] and [[Inverness-shire]].  It is 1,152 feet above sea level and has a north-east to south-west orientation.
  
 
The name of the lake is from the Gaelic language, in which it is known as ''Loch Eireachd''.
 
The name of the lake is from the Gaelic language, in which it is known as ''Loch Eireachd''.
  
The village of [[Dalwhinnie]] sits at the north east end of the loch. The loch stretches 14½ in length from here and has a surface area of approximately 7 square miles.<ref>[http://www.scottish-places.info/features/featurefirst2483.html Loch Ericht, Gazetteer of Scotland]</ref> Loch Ericht is the tenth largest freshwater loch in the Highlands and has a good reputation for its trout fishing.<ref>[http://www.welcometoscotland.com/things-to-do/activities/fishing/aviemore-cairngorms/loch-ericht Fishing Loch Ericht, Welcome to Scotland]</ref>
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The village of [[Dalwhinnie]] sits at the north-east end of the loch. The loch stretches 14½ miles in length from here and has a surface area of approximately seven square miles.<ref>[http://www.scottish-places.info/features/featurefirst2483.html Loch Ericht, Gazetteer of Scotland]</ref> Loch Ericht is the tenth largest freshwater loch in the Highlands and has a good reputation for its trout fishing.<ref>[http://www.welcometoscotland.com/things-to-do/activities/fishing/aviemore-cairngorms/loch-ericht Fishing Loch Ericht, Welcome to Scotland]</ref>
  
 
The loch is part of a hydro-electric scheme and is dammed at both ends. Water flows into the northern end via the Cuaich Aqueduct. The southern end is linked to a hydro-electric power station at [[Loch Rannoch]] by the four-mile long [[River Ericht, Rannoch|River Ericht]]. The northern dam protects the village of [[Dalwhinnie]] from flooding.  
 
The loch is part of a hydro-electric scheme and is dammed at both ends. Water flows into the northern end via the Cuaich Aqueduct. The southern end is linked to a hydro-electric power station at [[Loch Rannoch]] by the four-mile long [[River Ericht, Rannoch|River Ericht]]. The northern dam protects the village of [[Dalwhinnie]] from flooding.  
  
 
==Mountains==
 
==Mountains==
Loch Ericht is surrounded by a number of [[Munro]]s, including [[Ben Alder]] ({{convert|1148|m|ft|0|x}}) and [[Geal-Chàrn]] ({{convert|1132|m|ft|0|x}}). Traditional hunting areas border the loch. These are called forests; the chief of which is Ben Alder Forest.
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Loch Ericht is surrounded by a number of [[Munro]]s, including [[Ben Alder]] (3,766 feet) and [[Geal Charn, Alder|Geal-Chàrn]] (3,714 feet). Traditional hunting areas border the loch. These are called ''forests''; the chief of which is Ben Alder Forest.
  
 
==References==
 
==References==

Latest revision as of 16:06, 20 August 2018

Loch Etricht from Beinn Bheòil

Loch Ericht is a freshwater loch of the Highlands, lying across the border between Perthshire and Inverness-shire. It is 1,152 feet above sea level and has a north-east to south-west orientation.

The name of the lake is from the Gaelic language, in which it is known as Loch Eireachd.

The village of Dalwhinnie sits at the north-east end of the loch. The loch stretches 14½ miles in length from here and has a surface area of approximately seven square miles.[1] Loch Ericht is the tenth largest freshwater loch in the Highlands and has a good reputation for its trout fishing.[2]

The loch is part of a hydro-electric scheme and is dammed at both ends. Water flows into the northern end via the Cuaich Aqueduct. The southern end is linked to a hydro-electric power station at Loch Rannoch by the four-mile long River Ericht. The northern dam protects the village of Dalwhinnie from flooding.

Mountains

Loch Ericht is surrounded by a number of Munros, including Ben Alder (3,766 feet) and Geal-Chàrn (3,714 feet). Traditional hunting areas border the loch. These are called forests; the chief of which is Ben Alder Forest.

References